Senior Design 2015

Senior Design Projects Spring 2015

A Portable, Cost-Effective Device to Quantify Spasticity in the Elbow Joint

Advisors – Wilsaan Joiner and Michelle Harris-Love
Team – Kathryn Radom, Mohamed Ali, David Remer, Laith Alhussein
Website – jedigripforce.onmason.com

Abstract –

The present study showcases the development of an inexpensive, portable device capable of accurately quantifying spasticity in the elbow joint, which may help a clinician to properly assess the severity of a spastic patient’s state during rehabilitation. Furthermore, it may also provide insight regarding the role of passive muscular properties in post-stroke impedance modulation. Overall, the team conclusively demonstrated a reliable system, which therapists/clinicians may use to assess the severity of spastic attributes as well as rehabilitation progress and efficacy.

Development of a Flexible Ultrasound Transducer

Advisors – Siddhartha Sikdar and Parag Chitnis
Team – Lahlou, Ryan Fitzgerald, Jonathan Le, Brooke Blankenship
Website – projectflex.onmason.com

Abstract –

Ultrasound imaging is used for numerous applications; however, current transducers are not ideal for conforming to tissue and without proper handling can lead to motion artifacts, distorting the signal. Recently, miniaturized flexible ultrasound transducers have been designed, but are costly and require special equipment. The fabrication and testing of an economical and easily produced flexible ultrasound transducer is presented here. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and copper-clad polyimide was used to produce a low-cost transducer capable of fundamental imaging. Simulations of flat and curved implementations of our transducer supported our results that a more focused beam would result in stronger imaging power. Rudimentary imaging showed feasibility in the use of the transducers for tracking changes in muscle compartments.

Closed Loop In-Vitro Model of Vasculature

Advisors – Agrawal, Padmanabhan Seshaiyer
Team – Andre Hop, Matthew Tolbert, Nawal Boufrou, Nisha Sharma
Website – closedloopmicrofluidics.onmason.com

Abstract –

Open-loop microfluidic devices are the most common type of microfluidic device, which use pressure to drive fluid flow. Fluid flows into and out of the device limiting their use in long-term cell studies. Closed-loop microfluidic devices solve this problem by allowing for fluids and cells to stay in contact with other cells for long periods of time. The team developed a microfluidic device with a closed-loop channel to model in vitro vascular systems, and used COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS 3.4 to finalize the dimensions of the microfluidic device. The closed-loop microfluidic device has the potential to allow for long-term cell studies, mimicking the in vitro conditions needed for cell sustainability.

3D-MARK: A Virtual 3-D Marker for Neurosurgery

Advisor – Juan Cebral
Team – Alyson Farm, Lauren Marfurt, Rahul Pratap
Website – rpratap.onmason.com

Abstract –

We present an Android application that allows for a better communication system between neurosurgeons and researchers regarding aneurysm study and examination. This user-friendly mobile app allows medical professionals to continue helping patients remotely. The app allows for touch-based transformations such as zoom, rotate, and translate to manipulate and view the aneurysm model to fit the user’s needs. Since the aneurysm models are made up of a combination of thousands of triangles, the app allows users to select a specific triangle(s). The color of this triangle(s) can be changed in order to aid in communication between neurosurgeons and researchers. A color change could indicate information such as an area intended to be cut, or an area of wall weakness. The effective use of the transformations and selection will allow neurosurgeons and researchers to examine aneurysms successfully and ultimately provide efficient health care to patients.

Assistive Technology for the Visually Impaired

Advisors – Vasiliki Ikonomidou, Nathalia Peixoto
Team – Marissa Arager, Jennifer Le, Daniel Nguyen
Website – assisttechforthevisuallyimpaired.onmason.com

Abstract –

A small population of blind students and faculty at George Mason struggle to find their way around campus alone. The current assistive technologies available to these individuals come with certain limitations. They can be expensive, have inaccurate hardware, and are not characterized to fit an environment such as a university campus. This project aims to build an assistive navigation device that maps out George Mason’s Fairfax Campus and guides visually impaired individuals. The device communicates with its user through voice input and text-to-speech output, which is given to the user through a Bluetooth earpiece. This device successfully assists and guides blind individuals and can also be used by individuals who are unfamiliar with the campus.