Volgenau School of Engineering
George Mason University
George Mason University Mason
George Mason University

Computational Biomedicine

Computational biomedicine uses patient-specific image-based computational modeling to understand the mechanisms driving certain diseases. Modeling is an intrinsic component of most biomedical engineering research.

Juan Raul Cebral, professor of bioengineering

Juan Raul Cebral, professor of bioengineering, focuses on examining the blood flow in brain aneurysms to improve understanding of the causes, enhance aneurysm risk assessment, and evaluate devices and minimally invasive procedures.

In this research pillar, we focus on blood flow and aneurysms, the biomechanics of eye movement, and the extraction of wellness indicators from video feature analyses.

Our areas of expertise include:

Aneurysm risk assessment through computational modeling and minimally invasive procedures

This research examines the blood flow in brain aneurysms to improve understanding of the causes, enhance aneurysm risk assessment, and evaluate devices and minimally invasive procedures. We develop techniques and tools for modeling blood flows from 3D medical images and apply these techniques to study cerebrovascular diseases and their treatment. Principal investigator: Juan Raul Cebral.

Qi Wei, assistant professor of bioengineering

Qi Wei, assistant professor in the Bioengineering Department, develops realistic biomechanical models to study human movement and associated disorders.

Data-driven biomechanical simulation

Our focus is applying biomechanical models and computational simulation complemented by experimental data to advance our knowledge of human movement and to improve treatment of movement disorders. Our computational modeling approach enhances understanding of the basic components involved in movement in a constructive way. In collaboration with clinicians, we study the biomechanics of strabismus and pelvic floor disorders in order to identify potential new treatment regimes. Principal investigator: Qi Wei.

Signal and video analytics for wellness

This research uses video recordings, as well as contact measurements, in order to extract vital sign information, primarily heart rate variability, and to analyze it to infer wellness levels: body readiness, stress and fatigue levels, and diagnostic information. Techniques applied range from image processing to change point and anomaly detection. Our group’s interest ranges from consumer-level wellness solutions to security systems. Principal investigator: Vicky Ikonomidou.

Find out more about our latest grants and awards.

"Our goal is to help the person next door take charge of their health and lifestyle, catch and address the small changes before they become a disease. Our dream is a healthy, strong, and long life."

— Vicky Ikonomidou, associate professor of bioengineering